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Achilles Painter

Definition
The Achilles Painter, was a vase-painter active ca. 470-425 BC. His name vase is an amphora, Vatican 16571, in the Vatican museums depicting Achilles.
Type
foaf:Person, skos:Concept

Bowl

Definition
The term bowl is used to designate a plain, open shape without handles.
Type
kon:Shape, skos:Concept

Amasis Painter

Definition
The Amasis Painter is an Athenian black-figure painter active ca. 560-515 BCE. The name derives from the potter ("epoiesen") who signs as Amasis. Scholars debate if the painter and potter are one in the same. The painter sometimes combines the full black-figure technique with outline and at times employs a minituristic style. Shapes include different amphora types, lekythos, oinochoe, and alabastron. Subjects are Dionysos and his followers, other gods, draped figures, warriors, and revelers ("komasts"). Main findspots are Vulci and other sites in Etruria, Athens (Acropolis, Agora, Kerameikos), and Naukratis.
Type
foaf:Person, skos:Concept

Aryballos

Definition
Aryballos is the conventional name for an ovoid or ball-shaped oil pot with one or two handles. Used by athletes, it can be footed or footless. Some aryballoi are potted in the shape of a head, animal, or bird.
Type
kon:Shape, skos:Concept

Pointed Aryballos

Definition
The pointed aryballos follows the Middle Protocorinthian ovoid aryballos. In form it is taller and more top-heavy than its precursor, and it first appears in Late Protocorinthian before being replaced by a new, rounded aryballos.
Type
kon:Shape, skos:Concept

Bell Krater

Definition
The bell-krater is an innovation belonging to the red-figure technique. The body rises from a low disk-foot or sometimes a modified disk-foot into the hint of a stem before expanding into the shape of an inverted bell with a mildly flaring mouth with a torus lip. It has sturdy, horizontal, cylindrical handles that are located high up on the body opposite one another and are slightly upturned.
Type
kon:Shape, skos:Concept

Andokides

Definition
Andokides is an Athenian potter active ca. 530 BCE. Signing as potter ("epoiesen") on a number of vases, the potter is associated with several painters: the Andokides Painter, Psiax, and Epiktetos. Shapes are mainly cups, the amphora, and hydria. Subjects include Dionysos, Herakles, and Athena as well as athletes, warriors, and the symposion. Examples have been discovered in Etruria.
Type
foaf:Person, skos:Concept

Andodikes Painter

Definition
The Andokides painter was an ancient Athenian vase painter who was active from 530 to approximately 515 BCE. His work is unsigned; he is named after Andokides, the potter for whom he worked. He is believed to be the inventor of the red figure style of vase painting.
Type
foaf:Person, skos:Concept

Antimenes Painter

Definition
The Antimenes Painter is an Athenian black-figure painter active ca. 530-510 BCE. The name derives from the inscription “kalos Antimenes” (“Antimenes is beautiful”) appearing on a hydria from Vulci (Leiden, (Rijksmuseum II167 [PC63]; BAPD 320011) showing men washing in a fountain-house. Shapes are mostly the hydria and neck amphora. The painter has a wide range of mythological scenes, including Herakles, Dionysos, Amazons, Theseus and the Minotaur, and the Gigantomachy, as well as everyday scenes of the fountain-house and olive picking. Most examples have been discovered in Vulci and Tarquinia.
Type
foaf:Person, skos:Concept

Apulia

Definition
Apulia (Italian: Puglia)[note 1] is a region of Italy in Southern Italy bordering the Adriatic Sea in the east, the Ionian Sea to the southeast, and the Strait of Òtranto and Gulf of Taranto in the south. It was a major producer of Red Figure pottery during the Classical period.
Type
kon:ProductionPlace, skos:Concept

Askos

Definition
Meaning 'wine-skin,' the term askos is conventionally (and erroneously) used for a small, flat vase, with narrow sloping spout and handle arching over body. A variant exists in the form of a double-askos.
Type
kon:Shape, skos:Concept

Calyx Krater

Definition
The calyx-krater is one of the largest Attic vases, and is reminiscent of a bell-shaped flower. It is named for its convex lower body that has the configuration of the calyx of a flower, while the flaring upper body is suggestive of the bell-shaped corolla. It has large, robust, upturned handles situated opposite one another on the cul.The calyx-krater appears in Attic black-figure after the middle of the 6th c. BCE and is a popular shape until the end of red-figure.
Type
kon:Shape, skos:Concept

Athens

Definition
Athens dominates the Attica region and is one of the world's oldest cities, with its recorded history spanning around 3,400 years.
Type
kon:ProductionPlace, skos:Concept

Painter of Athens 1826

Definition
An Athenian white ground vase painter active around 460 B.C.
Type
foaf:Person, skos:Concept

Attica

Definition
Attica is an historical region that encompasses the city of Athens, the capital of Greece.
Type
kon:ProductionPlace, skos:Concept

Bareiss Painter

Definition
A late-sixth century B.C. Athenian black figure vase painter, probably part of the workshop known as the Medea Group.
Type
foaf:Person, skos:Concept

Belly Amphora

Definition
A belly amphora has a continuous, smooth curve from lip to foot. These amphorae have been classified as Types A, B, and C, based on differences in the shape of lips, feet, and handles.
Type
kon:Shape, skos:Concept

Fish Plate

Definition
A plate with a low foot, an overhanging rim, and a small depression in the centre of its floor for sauce. When figural, it is usually decorated with fish.
Type
kon:Shape, skos:Concept

Berlin Painter

Definition
The Berlin Painter (active c. 490s-c. 460s B.C.) is the conventional name given to an Attic Greek vase-painter who is widely regarded as a rival to the Kleophrades Painter, among the most talented vase painters of the early 5th century B.C.
Type
foaf:Person, skos:Concept

Black Figure

Definition
Black-figure pottery painting, also known as the black-figure style or black-figure ceramic (Greek, μελανόμορφα, melanomorpha) is one of the styles of painting on antique Greek vases. It was especially common between the 7th and 5th centuries BC, although there are specimens dating as late as the 2nd century BC.
Type
kon:Technique, skos:Concept

British Museum

Definition
The British Museum is a museum in London dedicated to human history and culture. Its permanent collection, numbering some 8 million works, is among the largest and most comprehensive in existence and originates from all continents, illustrating and documenting the story of human culture from its beginnings to the present.
Type
crm:E40_Legal_Body, skos:Concept

British Museum (collection)

Definition
The collection of the British Museum (institution).
Type
crm:E78_Collection, skos:Concept

Exaleiptron Type B

Definition
The Type B exaleiptron is the later of the two types and is differentiated by its tall, medium-wide stem terminating in a disc-like foot. Authorities do not fully agree on the name of this vase and it is also called ‘plemochoё’ and (incorrectly) ‘kothon.’ For further information on terminology, see 'exaleiptron.'
Type
kon:Shape, skos:Concept

Kernos

Definition
A cult vase, the kernos has a large bowl on its foot and small bowls attached to the rims.
Type
kon:Shape, skos:Concept

Corinth

Definition
Corinth was a city-state (polis) on the Isthmus of Corinth, the narrow stretch of land that joins the Peloponnese to the mainland of Greece, roughly halfway between Athens and Sparta.
Type
kon:ProductionPlace, skos:Concept

Cotugno Painter

Definition
A red figure painter active in Apulia from 370 to 360 B.C.
Type
foaf:Person, skos:Concept

Crete

Definition
Crete was once the center of the Minoan civilization (c. 2700–1420 BC).
Type
kon:ProductionPlace, skos:Concept

Plate

Definition
The plate is not a common shape in clay since it was more likely to have been made of wood. Figured plates (more commonly black-figure) seem to have been made for religious dedications.
Type
kon:Shape, skos:Concept

Kothon

Definition
The term kothon is used for a variety of different shapes. Some equate it (wrongly) with the exaleiptron, while others use the word to refer to a deep one-handled drinking cup. The vessel is sometimes ribbed and was carried by soldiers and travellers. The word kothon can also refer to the pilgrim flask shape.
Type
kon:Shape, skos:Concept

Eucharides Painter

Definition
Eucharides Painter is the common nickname of an ancient Greek artist who decorated but did not sign attic vases. Neither his real name, nor the dates of his birth and death are known. Presumably this artist was a pupil of the Nikoxenos painter.
Type
foaf:Person, skos:Concept

Hydria

Definition
Taking its name from the Greek 'hydor,' meaning 'water,' the hydria is a water-pot for the fountain. It has a capacious oval body, two horizontal handles, and one vertical handle. This type of vase was manufactured in bronze, in coarseware, and in fineware. See also kalpis.
Type
kon:Shape, skos:Concept

Exekias

Definition
Exekias is an Athenian potter ("epoiesen") and painter ("egrapsen") active from ca. 545-530 BCE. The painter’s work is generally considered to represent the apex of the black-figure technique, characterized by elegant draughtsmanship and intricately detailed ornamentation. Closely associated with Group E, Exekias mainly decorates the amphora, but also the pinax (plaque) and cups. Among his best known works are Ajax and Achilles, Achilles and Penthesilea, the Suicide of Ajax, and Dionysos reclining in a boat in possible reference to a Homeric Hymn. The plaques depict scenes connected to the funeral and perhaps lined the inside of the tomb. Main findspots are Athens (Acropolis, Agora), Italy (mostly Etruria), as well as Samos, Miletos, Berezan, and Cyrene.
Type
foaf:Person, skos:Concept

The Fralin Museum of Art

Definition
The Fralin Museum of Art of the University of Virginia
Type
crm:E40_Legal_Body, skos:Concept

Archaic

Definition
Archaic denotes Greek vases and other arts produced from ca. 600-480 BCE. It thus falls between the Orientalizing (ca. 700-600 BCE) and Classical (ca. 480-323 BCE) stylistic periods. The Archaic is sometimes divided into Early and Late (or “Ripe”) phases according to region, and its date range is sometimes pushed back to ca. 700 BCE based on certain archaeological factors. The term applies to the decorated vases of Athens, Corinth, Laconia, Boeotia, and other regions of ancient Greece. The main vase-painting technique in Athens is black-figure (invented in Corinth late 7th c. BCE), followed by red-figure (invented in Athens ca. 530-520 BCE). Major Athenian vase-painters from the time include Lydos, Amasis Painter, Exekias, Euphronios, Brygos Painter, and Berlin Painter.
Type
crm:E4_Period, skos:Concept

J. Paul Getty Museum

Definition
The J. Paul Getty Museum, commonly referred to as the Getty, is an art museum in California housed on two campuses: the Getty Center and Getty Villa.
Type
crm:E40_Legal_Body, skos:Concept

Group E

Definition
Group E is a large group of Athenian black-figure painters active ca. 560-540 BCE. The name derives from a close association to Exekias, who signs a Group E vase as potter ("epoiesen"). Group E painted the pelike, different amphora types, the lekythos, and kraters. Subjects include the Birth of Athena, Herakles, Amazons, Theseus and the Minotaur, as well as athletes, the symposion, and funerary scenes. Findspots are Athens (Acropolis, Agora, Kerameikos), Chalkidike, Vulci, Spina, North Africa, and Russia.
Type
foaf:Group, skos:Concept

Harvard Art Museums

Definition
The Harvard Art Museums is part of Harvard University and comprise three museums: the Fogg Museum (established in 1895), the Busch-Reisinger Museum (established in 1903), and the Arthur M. Sackler Museum (established in 1985) and four research centers: the Archaeological Exploration of Sardis (founded in 1958), the Center for the Technical Study of Modern Art (founded in 2002), the Harvard Art Museums Archives, and the Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies (founded in 1928). The three museums that comprise the Harvard Art Museums were initially integrated into a single institution under the name Harvard University Art Museums in 1983. University was dropped from the institutional name in 2008.
Type
crm:E40_Legal_Body, skos:Concept

Kotyle

Definition
Used as an alternative for skyphos, the term kotyle refers to a deep cup with two horizontal handles that lacks an offset lip.
Type
kon:Shape, skos:Concept

Incised

Definition
The technique of incision, a necessary attribute of Black Figure.
Type
kon:Technique, skos:Concept

Italy

Definition
The production place of Italy.
Type
kon:ProductionPlace, skos:Concept

Kalpis

Definition
The so-called Kalpis or Continuous-curve Hydria differs from the Shoulder Hydria in several ways: the neck, shoulder, and body form a continuous curve; its vertical handle is cylindrical and is rooted on the neck rather than on the lip; its foot shape is more varied; its rim is concave on top; and it is usually smaller. It was popular between the end of the sixth through the fourth century B.C.
Type
kon:Shape, skos:Concept

Kamares Ware

Definition
Kamares wares are a distinctive type of ceramic produced in Crete during the Minoan period.
Type
kon:Ware, skos:Concept

Kleitias

Definition
Kleitias is an Athenian black-figure painter active ca. 575-550 BCE who signs his name as painter (“egrapsen”). His best-known work is a volute-krater known as the François Vase, which was found in Chuisi (Etruria) and is now in Florence (Archaeological Museum 4209; BAPD 300000).It displays a series of mythological scenes and a large number of inscriptions. Other vases attributed to the painter portray Odysseus, warriors, Amazons, dancing youths, and maidens. Other shapes include the Siana cup, Little Master cup, skyphos, and hydria. Findspots include Athens (Acropolis, Agora), Samos (Heraion), Naukratis, Etruria, and Cyrene.
Type
foaf:Person, skos:Concept

Kleophrades

Definition
Kleophrades signed cups as potter (epoiesen 'made it') that were decorated by a variety of painters. Other vases have been attributed to him on the basis of style. He was the son of the potter Amasis (q.v.).
Type
foaf:Person, skos:Concept

Kleophrades Painter

Definition
The Kleophrades Painter is the name given to the anonymous red-figure Athenian vase painter, who was active from approximately 510 – 470 BCE and whose work, considered amongst the finest of the red figure style, is identified by its stylistic traits.
Type
foaf:Person, skos:Concept

Krater

Definition
From the Greek word meaning 'to mix,' a krater is a large, open bowl for mixing water and wine.
Type
kon:Shape, skos:Concept

Volute Krater

Definition
A krater with volutes that curl over the rim, it is the most elaborate vase of its type. The ancient name is Laconian in origin.
Type
kon:Shape, skos:Concept

Leagros Group

Definition
The Leagros Group is a group of black-figure painters active ca. 520-500 BCE. The name derives from the inscription “Leagros kalos” (“Leagros is beautiful”) on several vases. Painters identified with the group include the Acheloos Painter, Chiusi Painter, and Daybreak Painter. Also associated are the Antiope Group, Group of Würzburg 210, and Group of Vatican 424. Several hundred vessels are attributed to the group, including shapes like the neck amphora, hydria, lekythos, krater, and Panathenaic amphora. Favorite scenes of the group are Herakles and the Trojan War, as well as Dionysian themes. Findspots are Vulci and other Etruscan sites, southern Italy and Sicily, and the Athenian Agora.
Type
foaf:Group, skos:Concept

Lekythos

Definition
Lekythos' is a general word used to denote an oil bottle. The term is now conventionally used for tall and squat shapes with a foot, a single vertical handle, a narrow neck and a small mouth. Sometimes the basic form is fashioned into fancy shapes such as an acorn or an almond, or into a human figure. Some carry appliqué designs.
Type
kon:Shape, skos:Concept

Lydos

Definition
Lydos is an Athenian black-figure painter active ca. 560-540 BCE. The name derives from vases signed as “ho Lydos” (“the Lydian”), such as a dinos from the Athenian Acropolis (Athens, National Museum Acr. 607; BAPD 310147) where he is signed as painter ("egrapsen"). Lydos painted a variety of large and small shapes, including the column krater, amphora, hydria, Siana cup, cups of other types, and plates. Scenes include Herakles, Dionysos, Theseus, draped men, and the Trojan War. The vases have been found primarily in Athens (Acropolis, Agora, Kerameikos), southern Italy, Etruscan sites, and Sicily.
Type
foaf:Person, skos:Concept

Marine Style

Definition
A Bronze Age Minoan style perhaps inspired by frescoes, the entire surface of a pot was covered with sea creatures, octopus, fish and dolphins, against a background of rocks, seaweed and sponges.
Type
kon:Style, skos:Concept

Medea Group

Definition
The Medea Group decorated vases in the black-figure technique in Athens in the late 500s B.C.
Type
foaf:Group, skos:Concept

Meidias

Definition
Athenian potter who signed the calpis in the British Museum 'Meidias epoiesen' (made it).
Type
foaf:Person, skos:Concept

Meidias Painter

Definition
The Meidias Painter was an Athenian red-figure vase painter in Ancient Greece, active in the last quarter of the 5th century B.C..
Type
foaf:Person, skos:Concept

Myson

Definition
Myson is an Athenian red-figure painter active ca. 500-475 BCE. The name derives from signatures as painter (“egrapsen”) and potter (“epoiesen”) on a column krater from the Athenian Acropolis (Athens, National Museum Akr. 806; BAPD 202359) showing Athena. Other shapes are the pelike, calyx krater, psykter, and oinochoe. Scenes include revelers (“komasts”), the symposion, athletes, Dionysos and satyrs, Croesus seated on a pyre, Amazons, the Struggle for the Delphic Tripod, and other scenes with Herakles. Some findspots are Athens (Acropolis, Agora, Kerameikos), Etruria (Vulci, Cerveteri), Orvieto, Falerii, Locri (south Italy), and Kerch.
Type
foaf:Person, skos:Concept

Incense Burner

Definition
This shape is also known as a thymiaterion.
Type
kon:Shape, skos:Concept

Nikosthenes

Definition
Nikosthenes is an Athenian potter active ca. 540-510 BCE. Signing a large number of vases as potter ("epoiesen"), Nikosthenes is associated with Painter N and several other painters. Shapes include the Nikosthenic amphora (based on an Etruscan shape), Nikosthenic pyxis, kyathos-dipper, skyphos, and psykter. Subjects include satyrs, Dionysos, warriors, revelers ("komasts"), athletes, riders, and scenes with Athena. Most examples have been discovered in Etruria.
Type
foaf:Person, skos:Concept

Nikosthenes Painter

Definition
Athenian red-figure vase-painter whose name is unknown. Nevertheless consistent individual characteristics of style suggest the existence of a unique artistic personality. Beazley called him the Nikosthenes Painter naming him after the potter Nikosthenes who signed some of the vases he decorated.
Type
foaf:Person, skos:Concept

Nikosthenic Amphora

Definition
An amphora that displays two flat strap handles. It can be found mostly in black-figure and was named after the signature: Nikosthenes "epoiesen."
Type
kon:Shape, skos:Concept

Nolan Amphora

Definition
A subtype of amphora
Type
kon:Shape, skos:Concept

Oinochoe

Definition
The term 'oinochoe' means 'wine-pourer.' The wine jug is fashioned in many varieties (conical, concave, convex) but is usually furnished with a single vertical handle. The mouth can be round, trefoil, or beak-shaped.
Type
kon:Shape, skos:Concept

Olpe

Definition
The word 'olpe' is Greek for 'jug' and is conventionally used for a slender-shaped jug with a low handle and no separate neck.
Type
kon:Shape, skos:Concept

Onesimos

Definition
Onesimos is an Athenian red-figure painter active ca. 505-480 BCE, and associated with the Proto-Panaitian Group. The name derives from a cup found at Vulci signed as painter (“egrapsen”) by Onesimos and as potter (“epoiesen”) by Euphronios (Paris, Louvre G105; BAPD 203218) showing horsemen. The primary shape is the cup (kylix). Other shapes are the skyphos, plate, and pyxis. Subjects include Theseus, Herakles, the Trojan War, the symposion, revelers (“komasts”), athletes, and nude females. Some findspots are Etruria (Vulci, Cerveteri, Tarquinia, Chiusi, Orvieto), sites in southern Italy and Sicily, Athens (Acropolis, Agora), and Naukratis.
Type
foaf:Person, skos:Concept

Painter N

Definition
Painter N is an Athenian black-figure painter connected to the workshop of the potter Nikosthenes and active ca. 540-520 BCE. The Nikosthenic amphora was probably decorated by Painter N as well as the kyathos, cups, and psykter. Decorative subjects include satyrs, Dionysos, warriors, revelers ("komasts"), athletes, riders, and scenes with Athena. Most have been discovered in Etruria.
Type
foaf:Person, skos:Concept

Panathenaic Amphora

Definition
Panathenaic amphorae are big, ovoid, lidded vases that were presented as prizes to winners of the Panathenaic Games, which were held once every four years in Athens in honor of Athena, patroness of the city. They were filled with olive oil from Athena's sacred trees. The series, presumed to date to the reorganization of the games about 560 BCE, was produced through the Hellenistic period and beyond. The Panathenaic amphorae of the Classical period are of the finest quality construction. Panathenaic amphorae were only decorated in the black-figure technique.
Type
kon:Shape, skos:Concept

Phiale Painter

Definition
The Phiale Painter was a painter of the Attic red-figure style. He was active around 460 to 430 BC. The Phiale Painter is assumed to have been a pupil of the Achilles Painter.
Type
foaf:Person, skos:Concept

Pointed Amphora

Definition
The pointed amphora is an amphora that elongates at the neck and forms a pointed bottom. It was often used for transport.
Type
kon:Shape, skos:Concept

Polion

Definition
An Attic vase painter active 430-410 B.C.
Type
foaf:Person, skos:Concept

Classical

Definition
Classical denotes Greek vases and other arts produced from ca. 480-323 BCE. It thus falls between the Archaic (ca. 600-480 BCE) and Hellenistic (323-31 BCE) stylistic periods. These dates are based on two historical events: the Persian invasion of Athens in 480 BCE and the death of Alexander the Great in 323 BCE. Classical is often divided into the three phases of Early, High, and Late, based on stylistic development. The main vase-painting techniques in Athens are red-figure and white-ground, with black-figure still in use for the Panathenaic amphora. Major Athenian vase-painters from this time include the Pan Painter, Niobid Painter, Achilles Painter, Polygnotos, and Eretria Painter.
Type
crm:E4_Period, skos:Concept

Red Figure

Definition
The term refers to a form of decoration on Greek vases, in which figures appear in red, with slip-painted background and details.
Type
kon:Technique, skos:Concept

Shoulder Hydria

Definition
The so-called Shoulder Hydria is primarily a black-figure shape and dates mostly from ca. 525 through the second quarter of the fifth century B.C.
Type
kon:Shape, skos:Concept

Silhouette

Definition
The term "Silhouette" refers to a form of decoration found on Corinthian and Attic figured vases.
Type
kon:Technique, skos:Concept

South Italian

Definition
South Italian (including Sicilian) styles of Greek-styled pottery.
Type
kon:Style, skos:Concept

Squat Lekythos

Definition
The squat lekythos is a type of lekythos that lacks the sharp shoulder of the cylindrical types that was made primarily in the late 4th c. BCE.
Type
kon:Shape, skos:Concept

Terracotta

Definition
Most common material of Greek and Roman fired clay vessels.
Type
crm:E57_Material, skos:Concept

Timokrates Painter

Definition
The Timokrates Painter decorated vases in the white-ground technique in Athens from about 470 to 460 B.C.
Type
foaf:Person, skos:Concept

Type A Exaleiptron

Definition
The Type A Exaleiptron dates earlier than Type B and displays a shorter, wider flaring foot.
Type
kon:Shape, skos:Concept

Type B Exaleiptron

Definition
The Type B Exaleiptron displays a tall, medium-wide stem that terminates in a disk-like foot.
Type
kon:Shape, skos:Concept

Tyrrhenian Amphora

Definition
The Tyrrhenian Amphora or Ovoid Amphora displays less of an obvious shoulder.
Type
kon:Shape, skos:Concept

Ure Museum of Greek Archaeology

Definition
The Ure Museum of Greek Archaeology contains one of the most important collections of Greek antiquities in the United Kingdom. The Museum forms part of the Department of Classics at the University of Reading and is situated on the university's Whiteknights Campus, about two miles from the centre of the English town of Reading, Berkshire.
Type
crm:E40_Legal_Body, skos:Concept

Vasiliki Ware

Definition
The EM IIA and IIB Vasiliki Ware, named for the Minoan site in eastern Crete, has mottled glaze effects, early experiments with controlling color, but the elongated spouts drawn from the body and ending in semicircular spouts show the beginnings of the tradition of Minoan elegance.
Type
kon:Ware, skos:Concept

Villa Giulia Painter

Definition
An Athenian red figure painter whose name is unknown. He is named for the location of one of his vases.
Type
foaf:Person, skos:Concept

Kyathos

Definition
This term indicates a deep ladle with a cup-shaped container and a long handle.
Type
kon:Shape, skos:Concept

Vouni Painter

Definition
A white-ground artist active in Athens from 470-460 B.C.
Type
foaf:Person, skos:Concept

West Greece

Definition
Generic term for West Greece, including Magna Graecia, Spain, Southern France, and North Africa.
Type
kon:ProductionPlace, skos:Concept

White Ground

Definition
White-ground technique is a style of ancient Greek vase painting in which figures appear on a white background. It developed in the region of Attica, dated to about 500 B.C.
Type
kon:Technique, skos:Concept

Wild Goat Style

Definition
The Wild Goat Style is a modern term describing vase painting produced in the east of Greece, namely the southern and eastern Ionian islands, between circa 650 to 550 BCE.
Type
kon:Style, skos:Concept

Group of Würzburg 221

Definition
Attic vase painters, active ca. 480-450 B.C.
Type
foaf:Group, skos:Concept

Lagynos

Definition
A wine jug with low, bulging body, flat shoulder, tall neck and long vertical handle.
Type
kon:Shape, skos:Concept

Euphronios

Definition
Euphronios is an Athenian red-figure painter active ca. 520-505 BCE, who signed as both painter (“egrapsen”) and potter (“epoiesen”). Euphronios is considered a member of the Pioneer Group, along with Euthymides, Phintias, and other vase-painters. Shapes connected to the painter are cups, the calyx krater, stamnos, psykter, and pelike. The cup is the main shape connected to the potter. Scenes include Herakles and Antaios, athletes, the symposion, and Amazons. One of the best known works is a krater formerly in the Metropolitan Museum of Art (1972.11.10; BAPD 187) showing the personifications of Sleep (“Hypnos”) and Death (“Thanatos”) carrying Sarpedon from the battlefield at Troy. Some findspots are sites in Etruria (Vulci, Cerveteri, Orvieto, Tarquinia), Athens (Agora, Acropolis), Thasos, and Olbia (Black Sea).
Type
foaf:Person, skos:Concept

Alabastron

Definition
Based on Egyptian alabaster prototypes, this small vase for perfume or oil has a broad, flat mouth, narrow neck, a thin, bag-shaped body (sometimes with lugs), and is usually footless. Used for women's toilet and for cult, its contents were extracted with a dipstick.
Type
kon:Shape, skos:Concept

Amphora

Definition
Meaning 'carry on both sides,' the amphora is made in all fabrics. It has two vertical handles, a wide body, and a narrower neck. Some have a broad foot, some have lids and their size can vary. Used for both liquids and solids, the three main types are: 1) Transport amphora -- a large coarse-ware shape with a long body, small toe and narrow mouth that can be stoppered. 2) Neck amphora -- there are many varieities in fine ware, all sharing an offset neck. In addition, there are specially named variants, e.g. Nikosthenic, Nolan, Panathenaic, and pointed. 3) Belly amphora -- the body and neck form a continuous curve. The forms of handles, mouth, and feet differ among the various types of amphorae.
Type
kon:Shape, skos:Concept

Amphora Type A

Definition
The amphora Type A has a flaring lip with concave sides, flat flanged handles, a foot with the upper part stepped, and a lower echinus or torus. An early amphora shape that was popular in the black-figure technique, it was produced from the early 6th c. BCE to about 440 BCE.
Type
kon:Shape, skos:Concept

Amphora Type B

Definition
The amphora Type B has a flaring lip with straight or slightly concave sides, an echinus foot, and cylindrical handles. It is one of the oldest shapes, produced from the late 7th c. BCE until about 425 BCE.
Type
kon:Shape, skos:Concept

Amphora Type C

Definition
The amphora Type C has a rounded lip and torus or echinus foot and its handles vary in shape. It was potted from the second quarter of the 6th c. BCE in the black-figure technique (especially by the Affecter's workshop), and from ca. 520 BCE to 470 BCE in the red-figure technique.
Type
kon:Shape, skos:Concept

Bail Amphora

Definition
The handles of the bail amphora reach over the mouth. This type of amphora was used for storing and carrying wine, oil, and other commoditities, for serving wine at the table, and as an ash urn for the dead.
Type
kon:Shape, skos:Concept

Neck Amphora

Definition
An amphora where the neck joins the body at sharp angles instead of a smooth curve. The neck and the body are offset, meaning that the curve and shape changes radically where the neck meets the shoulder.
Type
kon:Shape, skos:Concept

Shoulder-handled Amphora

Definition
Originiating in the Protogeometric period, the shape is one of the four types in use at the time. The name is derived from the location of its handles, which are placed on the shoulder of the vessel. The shoulder-handled amphora seems to have been developed in Athens at the beginning of the Protogeometric period but only became popular at the end, when it sometimes replaced the belly-handled amphora in female burials.
Type
kon:Shape, skos:Concept

Amphoriskos

Definition
The small version of the amphora, the amphoriskos is based on the pointed variant of the neck-amphora or transport amphora. Used for perfumed oil, some carry stamped designs.
Type
kon:Shape, skos:Concept

Ovoid Aryballos

Definition
A common shape in Middle Protocorinthian, this aryballos has an ovoid body that gradually narrows at the neck before flaring at its lip.
Type
kon:Shape, skos:Concept
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